Course Offered: Through the Leaf-Mould: Speculative Fiction Writing

Are you an aspiring fantasy and science fiction writer? If so, I have good news! I am teaching a speculative fiction writing workshop at the Thomas More Institute (3405 Atwater Avenue, Montreal) called "Through the Leaf-Mould: Speculative Fiction Writing." You will read selections from speculative fiction authors such as Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia Butler, …

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Congrès Boréal 2018: Differences between Anglophone and Francophone SF

It has been four months since I attended this year's Congrès Boréal, so a write-up on the conference is probably overdue. Nevertheless, I would like to share some of my impressions of my first foray into this predominantly French-language science fiction and fantasy convention. Congrès Boréal is probably Québec's main literary fantasy and science fiction …

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MythCon 46: The Arthurian Mythos Part III: Attebery, Politics, and Worldviews

Sunday 2 August 2015 was the date of my long-awaited presentation on Charles de Lint's multicultural utopia. Although this post will not include a copy of my presentation--that will be for next week, when I will discuss the final day of lectures at MythCon 46--I do include a significant panel involving the inestimable Brian Attebery, one of the key scholars …

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Archaeological Adventure Fiction II: Uncharted: Poe’s Fortune

Last week's post discussed the Indiana Jones series and the works of pulp fiction author A. Merritt, who may have partly influenced the movies. One modern (or postmodern) narrative continues the tradition of what I call archaeological adventure fiction: the video game series Uncharted. Hero Nathan Drake is a professional thief, who believes he is …

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Archaeological Adventure Fiction I: Indiana Jones and the Genre of Enlightenment

"Archaeology is the search for fact. Not truth. [...] So forget any ideas you’ve got about lost cities, exotic travel, and digging up the world. You do not follow maps to buried treasure and "X" never, ever, marks the spot. Seventy percent of all archaeology is done in the library. Research. Reading. We cannot afford …

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